Thursday, May 21, 2009

How to Read & Write Arabic 16: TTAA

Before we look at this week's letter ttaa I want to offer endless appologies for the appaling quality of this week's posting.  The Mac seems to have gone into some bizzare not-working blonde ritual and after many hours, no, days, of trying to work out what is wrong, I am simply unable to improve on what is here.

Appologies once again, but it seems more important to post than to worry about a few hundred typos ...

So, this week we'll look at another letter which is very similar in sound and looks to the last letter which was introduced, daad.


Speaking Ttaa
Like the last letter DHaa, the sound for ttaa needs to come from your lungs rather than from your mouth. Again use the technique of blowing on your glasses to clean them. Blow on your glasses to make them steam up and make an hhrrrh sound whilst you’re doing it. Once you can do this, add a deep ‘T’ to the beginning of the sound and keep it deep and low.

Remember; keep the sound as low as possible and keep your tongue on the back of your two front teeth whilst you make the sound.

To help you remember, think of this letter as the ‘Traveling T’ – both Tey-yarr-raa (airplane) and mat-Tar (airport) contain this letter.


Writing Taa
Writing Taa is easy; it's a very similar shape to the letters Saad and DHad, you simply make the short vertical stroke longer, like so:


medial



Initial








Meidal
See if you can find the letter taa by yourself:

href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_MrhDVpQZt6E/ShXAlEwdiOI/AAAAAAAABnI/nRjDMZwXfuE/s1600-h/thaa+-+hide+%2B+seek+6.jpg">








final









1 comment:

haitham said...

Living in Japan, I am impressed with the relative rarity of transliteration in Arabic. For example, the fact that voltage has an Arabic equivalent. (It's just transliterated in Japanese, along with many, many other things.)